05 PM | 25 Jul

Piccinini’s human #sculpture Graham heads Vic road safety #campaign [#geekgirl]

Graham-TAC-Campaign

Victoria’s latest road safety campaign has a new face and it is sure to be one most people will not forget in a hurry.

An unusual human sculpture, named Graham, has been created by renowned Melbourne artist Patricia Piccinini in collaboration with a leading trauma surgeon and crash investigation expert.

Humans would have to look something like Graham in order to survive a crash, according to the Transport Accident Commission (TAC).

Graham has a large thick skull, is lacking a neck, and has sacks of air on his chest to act like car airbags.

Piccinini used silicone, fibreglass, resin and human hair to make him.

“I really listened and internalised the science of it and then I approached it in a creative way, on an emotional level,” she said.

“The eyes are where the work is, it’s where the viewer can really connect with him and empathise.”

(sic)

The TAC said the campaign was different from its usual campaigns and was designed to highlight human vulnerability on the road.

“Our vulnerabilities are at the heart of everything that we do in road safety – how do we protect ourselves on our roads,” TAC chief executive officer Joe Calafiore said.

Source: ABC

05 PM | 25 Jul

And the earth sighed a #video #installation by Starrs and Cmielewski [#geekgirl]

and the earth sighed: starrs & cmielewski from Josephine Starrs on Vimeo.

And the earth sighed was an immersive audiovisual installation that re-imagines the relationship between nature and culture, Starrs and Cmielewski configure the land itself as active, not neutral, and able to speak about our human impacts upon it.

Using imagery captured by drones, detailed aerial views of Australian landscapes and waterways are dynamically manipulated in ways that reveal their underlying fragility; while Alex Davies’ surround-soundscape invites contemplation of the impact of climate change on natural ecologies. Documentation of ‘and the earth sighed’ which was a video installation shown at Arts House Melbourne 2016

Created by Josephine Starrs and Leon Cmielewski. Audio: Alex Davies Documentation: Takeshi Kondo

Source: Facebook

04 PM | 25 Jul

The birth of #biohybrid beings, part #animal, part #robot [#geekgirl]

This robot ray is the most successful artificial animal yet!

The soft rubber body of the #robot ray is made with a 3-D-printed gold skeleton so thin it functions like cartilage. Geneticists adapted rat heart cells so they could respond to light by contracting. Then, they were grown in a carefully arranged pattern on the rubber and around the gold skeleton. Watch the video.

The birth of biohybrid beings

The new engineered animal responds to light so well scientists were able to guide it through an obstacle course 15 times its length using strong and weak light pulses.

The study authors write, “Our ray outperformed existing locomotive biohybrid systems in terms of speed, distance traveled, and durability (six days), demonstrating the potential of self-propelled, phototactically activated tissue-engineered robots.”

What biohybrid mean for robots and artificial intelligence

Science of this type is fundamental for engineering special-purpose creations such as artificial worms that sniff out and eat cancer. Or bionic body parts for those who have suffered accidents or disease. Imagine having little swimmers in your system that rush to the site of a medical emergency such as a stroke. The promise of sensor-rich soft tissue frees robots to move more easily and yet not be cut off from needed input. Sensitized robot soft tissue could perform without the energy-sucking heaviness of metal or the artificial barrier of hard-plastic exoskeletons.

Source: Inc