geekgirl (r)osiex aka the metal cupcake publishing about interesting things for a really long time!
  • “Strips and Pieces” [#geekgirl]

    [Via Robot Hugs]

    [Via Robot Hugs]

  • Australia’s People Climate March [#geekgirl]

    “On September 21, tens of thousands of Australians will hit the streets of Melbourne, together with thousands more in cities and towns across Australia, as part of the world’s largest People’s Climate March. Our message is simple – Action, Not Words – it’s time for Australia to get out of the way of real climate action, to say no to new fossil fuel expansion and to protect and grow our renewable energy sector. But it doesn’t end here. When you join us on September 21, we’ll also ask you to pledge to help Action win over Words by committing to exercise your political, consumer and grassroots power in a number of exciting ways. Stay tuned for more updates but in the meantime RSVP for an event near you or register your own event.”

  • Beyond the #Interface Exhibition [#Geekgirl] [#BlowingOwnHorn] [#ISMAR2014]

    [#BlowingOwnHorn]

    [#BlowingOwnHorn]

  • Game of Thrones Transit Maps [#geekgirl] [#GoT]

    [Image Credit: Michael Tyznik]

    [Image Credit: Michael Tyznik]

    [From an article at tyznik.com] “Inspired by the work of Cameron Booth and his awesome Transit Maps Tumblr, I created these rail maps of Westeros and The Known World. Hopefully fans will notice some small touches — the closed stations along the Wall Line, for example.”

  • “Don’t Look Down on Me ” [#geekgirl]

  • RIP, Robin Williams [#sad] [#suchloss] [#geekgirl]

     

  • The Toolbox Hairclip [#geekgirl]

    [Image Via Gizmodo]

    [Image Via Gizmodo]

    [From this Gizmodo article] “This innocuous hair clip…manages to replicate the functionality of quite a few tools, but will all but disappear when used to keep your bangs at bay.It can serve as a flat-head screwdriver, even for fixing those tiny screws on your glasses. It’s got a 5/16 wrench for tackling the occasional bolt, and there’s a serrated edge for hacking through rope, but hopefully not hacking through your hair when worn. It could very well be the smallest multi-tool you can buy for just $10, trumped only by the Q-Tip when it comes to cost versus functionality.”

  • “When Does A Woman Owe You Sex?” [#geekgirl]

    [Image Credit: mic.com (by Raquel Reichard)

    [Image Credit: mic.com (by Raquel Reichard)

  • “50 Essential Feminist Films…” [#geekgirl]

    [Image Credit: flavorwire.com]

    [Image Credit: flavorwire.com]

    [From an article at Flavorwire]“It’s no secret that the numbers surrounding women in cinema are dismal. The Playlist recently reported that only 74 of the 271 people invited to join the Academy of Motion Arts and Sciences this year were women. We also know that for every 15 or so male directors, there is just one female director. At the same time, filmmakers of all genders continue to explore new representations of women in cinema. We thought it was time to revisit some essential feminist films (a few classics and several, perhaps, unexpected picks) that deconstruct gender identity, explore issues pertinent to women and their history, and challenge the patriarchy. These films, directed by women and men, have broadened the scope of female representation in cinema.”

  • Call for Papers for Special Issue on Feminism and (Un)Hacking [#geekgirl]

    Journal of Peer Production (JoPP)
    Call for Papers for Special Issue on Feminism and (Un)Hacking

    Editors:  Shaowen Bardzell, Lilly Nguyen, Sophie Toupin

    There has been a recent growth in interest in feminist approaches to
    practices like hacking, tinkering, geeking and making. What started off
    as an interest in furthering representations of women in the technical
    fields of computer science and engineering, often along the lines of
    liberal feminism, has now grown into social, cultural, and political
    analyses of gendered modes of social reproduction, expertise, and work,
    among others. Practices of hacking, tinkering, geeking, and making have
    been criticized for their overtly masculinist approaches, often anchored
    in the Euro-American techno-centers of Silicon Valley and Cambridge that
    have created a culture of entrepreneurial heroism and a certain
    understanding of technopolitical liberation, or around the German Chaos
    Computer Club (CCC).

    With this special issue of the Journal of Peer Production, we hope to
    delve more deeply into these critiques to imagine new forms of feminist
    technical praxis that redefine these practices and/or open up new ones.
    How can we problematize hacking, tinkering, geeking and making through
    feminist theories and epistemologies? How do these practices, in fact,
    change when we begin to consider them through a feminist prism? Can we
    envision new horizons of practice and possibility through a feminist
    critique?

    In this call, we understand feminist perspectives to be pluralistic,
    including intersectional, trans, genderqueer, and race-sensitive
    viewpoints that are committed to the central principles of
    feminism–agency, fulfillment, empowerment, diversity, and social
    justice.  We refer to the term hacking with a full understanding of its
    histories and limitations. That said, we use it provisionally to
    provoke, stimulate, and reimagine new possibilities for technical
    feminist practice. Hacking, as a form of subjectivity and a mode of
    techno-political engagement, has recently emerged as a site of intense
    debate, being equally lauded as a political ethos of freedom and
    slandered as an elitist form of expertise. These fervid economic and
    political ideals have been challenged and at times come under attack
    because they not only displace women and genderqueer within these
    technological communities but, more importantly, because they displace
    gendered forms of reflection and engagement.

    Drawing on a growing community of feminist scholarship and practices, we
    hope to build on this momentum to invite submissions that
    reconceptualize the relationship between feminism and hacking. We aim to
    highlight feminist hackers, makers and geeks not only as new communities
    of experts, but as new modes of engagement and novel theoretical
    developments. In turn, with this special issue, we hope to challenge
    both concepts of feminism and hacking to ask several questions. How can
    feminist approaches to hacking open up new possibilities for
    technopolitics? Historically, hacking discourses center on political and
    labor aesthetics of creation, disruption, and transgression. How can
    feminist theories of political economy push technopolitical imaginaries
    towards alternate ideals of reproduction, care, and maintenance?
    Conversely, we also ask how notions of hacking can open up new
    possibilities for feminist epistemologies and modes of engagement?

    We seek scholarly articles and commentaries that address any of the
    following themes and beyond. We are also interested in portraits,
    understood broadly, of feminist hackers, makers and geeks that help us
    better understand feminist hacker, maker and geek culture. We also
    solicit experimental formats such as photo essays or other media that
    address the special issue themes.

    •        What is distinctive about feminist hacking or hackers?  How
    does feminist hacking practices help create a distinct feminist hacking
    culture?

    •        Why are feminist hacking practices emerging? Which
    constellation of factors help the emergence of such practices?

    •        What do we know about the feminist hacker spectrum? i.e. what
    are the differences among feminist hacking practices and how can we make
    sense of these distinctions?

    •        What tensions in hacking and/or in hacker practices and
    culture(s) come to the fore when feminist, anti-patriarchal,
    anti-racist, anti-capitalist and/or anti-oppression perspectives are taken?

    •        What does feminist hacker ethic(s) entail?

    •        What kind of social imaginaries are emerging with feminist
    hacking and hackers?

    •        What kinds of hacking are taking place beyond the Euro-American
    tradition?

    Submission abstracts of 300-500 words due by September 8, 2014, and
    should be sent to femhack@peerproduction.net.

    All peer reviewed papers will be reviewed according to Journal of Peer
    Production guidelines; see http://peerproduction.net/peer-review/process/.

    Full papers and materials (peer reviewed papers around 8,000 words and
    testimonies, self-portraits and experimental formats up to 4,000 words)
    are due by January 31st, 2015 for review.