geekgirl (r)osiex aka the metal cupcake publishing about interesting things for a really long time!
  • Game On! [2014 TippingPoint Australia Forum] [#geekgirl]

    [Via Tipping Point Australia]

    [Via Tipping Point Australia]

    “Building on TippingPoint Australia’s expertise in creating gatherings for artists, scientists and others to respond to the issue of climate change, Game on! proposes a new approach to navigating the high roads and the dead ends that abound as the impacts of climate change become more visible. We know what the problem is, how hairy it is, and how depressing it is and we know how we got here.  Now let’s do something about it.

    Game on!  is part forum, part game, part collaborative action planning, a chance to develop your ideas that are contributing  to the seismic cultural shift we’ll need for a future we want. Bring your projects, problems and prototypes and together we can find solutions, develop action plan, meet new collaborators and project partners. What are you working on that other people can jump in on? What do you have to offer (time, energy, skills,knowledge)?

    Dynamically facilitated by Matt Wicking and Angharad Wynne-Jones, with a master game maker – Harry Lee, and filled to the brim, (but not overstuffed) with artists, curators, scientists, futurists, gamers, activists, environmental professionals, technologists, designers, producers, pragmatists and optimists, Game On! is an opportunity to make up our minds to do something. Together.

    We would love you and your ideas and expertise to be in the room so we are keeping a place at the table for you. Please ensure your place by making a contribution of $20 before September 30th to cover the cost of delicious lunch which will be provided on the day.

    Register HERE.

    Once registered, please click HERE TO SUBMIT your project ideas and biography.”

  • “How to turn an entire room into a #gaming surface…” [#geekgirl]

  • The Styx from Skullmapping [#geekgirl]

    The Styx from Skullmapping on Vimeo.

    With ‘The Styx’, Skullmapping is venturing in a new direction. By using the technical knowledge build up in our mapping projects, we’ve decided to create an immersive multi sensoric virtual reality experience.
    ‘The Styx’ is being developed for ‘Leuven in Scène’ and will have it’s premiere on 11, 12 and 13 july 2014.

    Spectators arrive one by one at a predetermined time at the venue. At the entrance, the spectator receives a golden coin. A guide comes to pick them up and guides them into the room. The spectator takes place on a wooden bench and puts on an Oculus Rift (Virtual Reality Headset) and headphones, holding the coin in one hand. The viewer is able to look around 360 degrees in a virtual environment. Because of stereoscopy the spectator has the feeling that they are actually in that virtual world. Not only through 3D vision and 3D sound, but also through other sensoric experiences such as smell and touch.
    The story we bring is based on the myth of the Styx, the river in Greek mythology that formed the boundary between Earth and the Underworld. The spectator sinks down into the underground and ‘awakens’ next to a pier seated in a small boat. A mysterious figure (Charon) walks down the pier and jumps into the boat. He takes the coin the spectator is holding (the action of the virtual character is mimicked by the guide). Charon starts to row down the Styx, into the Underworld. He steers through a labyrinth of caves, overcoming unexpected obstacles, such as rapids and even a mythical creature. After these dark endeavours, we finally arrive in a peaceful, heavenly world. The little boat strands on a beach, and we’ve reached the end of our journey.

    http://skullmapping.com

    Credits
    Concept / Design / Animation: Antoon Verbeeck + Filip Sterckx
    Sounddesign: Valentijn Steenhoudt
    Camera: Pierre Schreuder
    Commissioned by Leuven in Scène

  • “Boys React to Girls Playing Dungeons and Dragons…” [#geekgirl]

  • “INSERT COIN Videogame Exhibition in Siracusa, IT” [#geekgirl]

    Our project so far - We decided to bring to life one of the projects we’re working on during 10 years of research and archiving: a Museum of working computers, a place where people can, both physically and remotely via Internet, enjoy using historical computers, know their history, learn basics of electronic and computer science, and share a piece of our history. A place where to conserve, repair, preserve in digital format and share our heritage, made of hardware but also documentation, software, electrical schemes, books, manuals and media of various kinds.”

  • “An Iranian developer’s entrancing game about his culture…” [#geekgirl]

    [From an article by Tracey Lien at Polygon]: “Projected onto a large screen to a crowd of hundreds of people, Bahrami showed solutions to his geometric, ancient Iranian art-influenced puzzle game. “So you have an object on a table,” he said to the audience, pointing to a screen where a rectangle sat on the edge of a desk. “Now if you draw a point somewhere on that object, what kind of line would it make if it fell?” He placed a dot on the corner of the rectangle. He hit “play.” The rectangle tumbled off the table, leaving behind a squiggly line.

    In the early build of Engare Bahrami showed, at the start of each level players were shown a line they had to replicate by placing a dot on a moving object. Perhaps it was a hook-like curve they had to recreate. Perhaps it was something that resembled the McDonald’s golden arches. Each of these puzzles was mind boggling on their own. Then Bahrami got meta: what if you drew a dot on the game’s menu tab so when you pulled up the menu, it created a line? And then what if you got rid of the menu and the table and the moving objects and just allowed the line to replicate itself again and again and again?”

  • 2059: FutureCoast [#geekgirl]

    [FUTURECOAST: Image Via Fast Company]

    [Image Via Fast Company]

    [Via Fast Company] “FutureCoast, launched in early February with the help of a National Science Foundation climate education grant and Columbia University, has at least a hundred other messages like the Last Lobster. Some are funny: Like the one woman in the seaside town of Brighton who can’t get home because the tide’s gotten too high and needs to seek shelter in a “flotel” for the night. Others are devastating. In one message, a woman with a trembling voice asks her friend in government if he might be able to help her locate her partner, who’s gone missing after having gone to interview protesters at a “refugee rights” demonstration.

    The emotional tenor and imagination of the messages range widely, but the futures aren’t actually that far off. In the FutureCoast world, voice messages are leaking into the present day from futures between 2020 and 2065. And some, like the disappearance of certain flora and fauna, mass political unrest, and water shortages, are incredibly realistic–just go and read the latest IPCC report.”

  • Aussie Female Game Developer Stats [#geekgirl]

    [Via Debi Taylor at Aussie Game Developer Census]

  • Escape Room #Melbourne [#geekgirl]

    Escape Room Melbourne is a live puzzle game, designed for 2 people. You have 60 minutes to unravel the mystery of a hidden room, working together to solve a variety of quirky and inventive puzzles to escape.”

  • Tired of the constant flood of #Cthulu and #zombie games? [#geekgirl]

    “…part of the reason they’re everywhere is that they’re both well known and free to use, and a lot of people who make games aren’t aware of just how many good stories they’re carrying around with them.

    There are SO MANY other stories and characters out there that are also free to use…Whatever the reason, a lot of these stories aren’t out there in games yet. So let’s MAKE SOME!

    Why not make a Robin Hood archery game, a Sherlock Holmes point-and-click adventure, or go crazy and make a Les Miserables bullet-hell shmup?

    1) Find a PUBLIC DOMAIN story or character
    2) Make a game between May 17 and May 24
    3) Submit it to the jam page.”