03 PM | 15 Nov

Helping #homeless #women and #girls this Christmas #itsinthebag @sharingdignity [#geekgirl]

#itsinthebag

You have the power to make life better for an Australian woman or girl experiencing homelessness or poverty this Christmas. Donate to the Christmas collection “It’s In The Bag”.  Provide pads and tampons, personal hygiene products and everyday luxuries to homeless women, women at risk or women experiencing domestic violence.

Taking collections between Nov 18 to Dec 2, 2017. See website for further info and collection points at Bunnings. sharethedignity.com.au

01 PM | 26 Feb

Speculative #Vegetation: #Plants in #SciFi Call for Papers [#geekgirl]

the day of the triffids

Plants have played key roles in some of the most notable science fiction, from prose to graphic novels and film: John Wyndham’s triffids, the sentient and telepathic flora in Ursula K. Le Guin’s “Vaster than Empires and More Slow,” the gene-hacked crops of Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl, the agricultural experiments of Andy Weir’s The Martian, the invasive trees and mechaflowers of Warren Ellis’s Trees, and the galactic greenhouses of Silent Running represent just a few. Plants surround us, sustain us, pique our imaginations, and inhabit our metaphors — and yet in some ways they remain opaque. As Randy Laist writes in Plants and Literature (2013): “Plants seem to inhabit a time-sense, a life cycle, a desire structure, and a morphology that is so utterly alien that it is easy and even tempting to deny their status as animate organisms” (12). The scope of their alienation is as broad as their biodiversity. And yet, literary reflections of plant-life are driven, as are many threads of science fictional inquiry, by the concerns of today.

This volume will be the first to investigate the importance of plants in science fiction. We encourage contributions contending with diverse works from any and all global, national, extranational, or regional positions and all periods. In particular, we welcome essays which consider genre with broader ethical, political, aesthetic, and historical concerns tied to the representation of botanical subjects and subjectivities in science fiction across all media.

Due: April 30, 2017

Prospective contributors to this edited collection should send an abstract (300-500 words) and brief CV or short biographical statement to Katherine Bishop (kbishop@sky.miyazaki-mic.ac.jp), Jerry Määttä (Jerry.Maatta@littvet.uu.se), and David Higgins (dmhiggin@gmail.com). For full consideration, abstracts are due by 30 April 2017. Completed essays of between 4,000 and 8,000 words will be due by 30 November 2017 for a projected publication date in 2018.

Source: Symbiotica Read full abstract