geekgirl (r)osiex aka the metal cupcake publishing about interesting things for a really long time!
  • Tant de Forêts [#geekgirl]

    Tant de Forêts – trailer from Burcu & Geoffrey on Vimeo.

  • A Gorgeous Cafe For Birds [#geekgirl]

  • PHD Examination Exhibition – Nancy Mauro-Flude

    “Tenebris in Lux : The Performance of Code and the Aesthetics of Transmission in contemporary art through practice-orientated research.”

    Summary Tenebris in Lux
    Start Date 7th Mar 2014 5:30pm
    End Date 17th Mar 2014 5:30pm
    Venue Plimsoll Gallery, Centre for the Arts, Hunter Street, Hobart
    RSVP / Contact Information Open 12 noon – 5pm, six days per week – closed Tuesdays.
  • “Be My Eyes: Connecting Blind & Sighted” [#geekgirl]

    [Image from "Be My Eyes"]

    “The non-profit app Be My Eyes will connect blind people with a community of normal sighted volunteers. Both parties install the app and when the blind person needs help he/she uses the app which calls out to the network of volunteers and sends a live video stream from the blind person’s device to the screen of the volunteer’s device. This way the volunteers can “be the blind person’s eyes” over the smartphone – therefore we’ve named it Be My Eyes!

    Want to know more about the story behind Be My Eyes?”

  • “Expired” Food is Good for You [#geekgirl]

    [Via salon.com] "Last September, a major report from the Natural Resources Defense Council and Harvard Law School squashed the long-standing myth surrounding “sell by,” “best by” and “use by” dates on food. It revealed how those dates, which are mostly unregulated and surprisingly arbitrary, tell the consumer next to nothing about how long a product will stay fresh. Yet 90 percent of Americans are under the mistaken impression that they do – and that they are inviolable – causing us to needlessly throw away food.

    The problem, however, begins even before such food reaches people’s refrigerators: It’s against most supermarkets’ policies (including that of Trader Joe’s) to sell food once it’s aged past these mystical dates. Dana Gunders, who co-authored the NRDC report with Emily Leib, sees Rauch’s project as the logical next step in freeing us from the tyranny of date labels. “Just the fact that he’s doing it, I think is a huge proof point to indicate that what we’re calling ‘expired food’ is in fact still good to eat,” she told Salon."

  • “Timon Singh West African Inventor Makes a $100 3D Printer From E-Waste” [#geekgirl]

    [Image Credit: inhabitat.com]

    [Image Credit: inhabitat.com]

    [Via inhabitat.com] “Kodjo Afate Gnikou, a resourceful inventor from Togo in West Africa, has made a $100 3D printer which he constructed from parts he scrounged from broken scanners, computers, printers and other e-waste. The fully functional DIY printer cost a fraction of those currently on the market, and saves environmentally damaging waste from reaching landfill sites.”

  • Announcing “Wish4[0]” [#geekgirl] [#elit]

    Wish4[0]

    Wish4[0]

    ‘This project is based on a poetic interpretation of the maxim ‘Be Careful What You Wish For’. The title of the work, Wish4[0]is a truncation – and linguistic reworking – of the idea of wish fulfilment in the digital age, one where willing users and audience members are subjected to an “always-on” news cycle, where social media and content streaming are the preferred method of information sourcing and privacy is an elastic concept.

    The inspiration for Wish4[0] came from an article describing how the use of mobile devices right before bed makes the production of melatonin – a substance human bodies produce naturally in order to induce sleep – less likely. This disruption of our normal sleep cycle via our voluntary use of tech designed for ease-of-use led me to ponder the subject of the allure of the digital news cycle – how many of us feel compelled to be perpetually connected, 24/7, to shareable “news”? Wish4[0] explores the perpetual pull of a user’s desire to be continually digitally connected.

    This project takes as its inspiration this perpetual tugging at a user’s consciousness by the digital: each day, for 40 days, I’ll create and post a creative response that will take as its immediate inspiration a headline – or item – drawn from the electronic news cycle of that specific day.

    |||This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.|||

  • The New Who vs Oldskool Timey-Wimey Whovians [#geekgirl] [#DrWho]

    —–[“The Time of The Doctor” SPOILERS (Sweetie) Alert]—–

    On the 25th December 2013, Doctor Who received 12 new lives. In the episode “The Time of The Doctor”, the current series showrunner, producer and lead writer Steven Moffat imbued the once-labelled as 11th [and now redubbed the 12th, or even 13th] Doctor a new regeneration cycle. In this episode filled with heavy-duty retconned plot threads, we see the New [old] Who emerge.

    From a traditional Whovian perspective, there’s been substantial trouble with Moffat’s version of a character who, like his regenerations, has undergone substantial re-jigging as part of the entire franchise reboot, many of which have been largely controversial. When Moffat plucked the Doctor Who writing mantle from Russell T Davis, there was substantial concern that his [then] largely episodic inflected story style wouldn’t be able to adequately extend beyond flashy emotion-inducing viewer bait, complete with thrill laden plot segments and incomplete long arc shifts where foregrounding, consistent character development and plots worthy of the previous writers were/are [mostly] abandoned.

    In this pivotal episode, Moffat attempts to disassemble and reassemble elements of the Who Canon in an effort to extend the longevity of the franchise beyond the Doctor’s accepted and restricted Regeneration cycle. The episode contains all the benchmarks we’ve come to expect from Moffat: companions posited as disposable tools or eye-candy mannequins, story gaps you could drive a TARDIS through and plot-hole-construction-gloss thrown about almost randomly by the shiny bucketful. The result creates a type of standard willing Suspension of Disbelief that only just lightly grips the edges of believability. Emotional key points fall cheaply and wantonly [like the death of his handy Cyberman-head-pal “Handles”, or the Doctor's promise to Clara that he'll never abandon her again]. The rushed passage-of-time markers rub the viewer in any manner of annoying ways, and flimsy self-referential exposition becomes paramount when the contrived CGI effects fail to impress.

    And yet, given all of the failings of this crucial episode, the emotional reefing that Moffat does best still manages to evoke a type of stretched wonder-thrall. Moffat discards [and has now for many, many episodes] conventions that traditional Dr Who fans hold dear: Joseph Campbellesque hero variables and crucial sci-fi story elements are bypassed in order to cater for more incrementally-oriented audience members used to absorbing their story snippets through 2 minute YouTube blipverts or Tumblr-emulating focals. Moffat knits together these contemporary absorption points via a method that, instead of catering for narratives comprising sequential beginning, middle and ends, seeks to harness the power of discrete narrative units. These units merge techniques drawn from graphic novel variable truncation to story-board framing, resulting in staggered story-time acceleration and retconned plot explosions designed for nonlinear attention spans.

    Moffat may not be the great grand hope for old-timey-whiney Whovians [ahem] who yearn for believable extensions to Who chronology beyond an established and pre-mapped regenerative timeline. But through the New Who incarnation, Moffat instead offers us an extension of a well-worn and much-loved character, one that at least utilises the very methods that a contemporary audience regularly deploys to maintain narratives beyond standard story knitting.

  • In Dreams [#geekgirl]

    “In Dreams is an experimental documentary that visualises the dreams of ordinary individuals. I asked 4 people to discuss their most vivid, memorable dream.”

  • TINY: A Story About Living Small [#geekgirl]

    TINY: A Story About Living Small (Teaser Trailer) from TINY on Vimeo.