12 PM | 26 Feb

The Case against #Fragrance a #book by Kate Grenville [#geekgirl]

the-case-against-fragrance

Kate Grenville had always associated perfume with elegance and beauty. Then the headaches started.

Like perhaps a quarter of the population, Grenville reacts badly to the artificial fragrances around us: other people’s perfumes, and all those scented cosmetics, cleaning products and air fresheners. On a book tour in 2015, dogged by ill health, she started wondering: what’s in fragrance? Who tests it for safety? What does it do to people?

The more Grenville investigated, the more she felt this was a story that should be told. The chemicals in fragrance can be linked not only to short-term problems like headaches and asthma, but to long-term ones like hormone disruption and cancer. Yet products can be released onto the market without testing. They’re regulated only by the same people who make and sell them. And the ingredients don’t even have to be named on the label.

This book is based on careful research into the science of scent and the power of the fragrance industry. But, as you’d expect from an acclaimed novelist, it’s also accessible and personal. The Case Against Fragrance will make you see – and smell – the world differently.

Source: Booktopia

01 PM | 19 Feb

Backstage at the London Science Museum’s #Robots exhibition [#geekgirl]

Design critic Oliver Wainwright goes behind the scenes at the Robots exhibition at the Science Museum in London. Curator Ling Lee introduces him to some of the most advanced humanoid robots in the world, from a lifelike baby to robots without conscience. She explains the stage that the technology is at, who may use it and how far it has to go.

Australian link: Science Museum’s trove of robotic delights holds a mirror to human society

Source: The Guardian

04 PM | 25 Jul

The birth of #biohybrid beings, part #animal, part #robot [#geekgirl]

This robot ray is the most successful artificial animal yet!

The soft rubber body of the #robot ray is made with a 3-D-printed gold skeleton so thin it functions like cartilage. Geneticists adapted rat heart cells so they could respond to light by contracting. Then, they were grown in a carefully arranged pattern on the rubber and around the gold skeleton. Watch the video.

The birth of biohybrid beings

The new engineered animal responds to light so well scientists were able to guide it through an obstacle course 15 times its length using strong and weak light pulses.

The study authors write, “Our ray outperformed existing locomotive biohybrid systems in terms of speed, distance traveled, and durability (six days), demonstrating the potential of self-propelled, phototactically activated tissue-engineered robots.”

What biohybrid mean for robots and artificial intelligence

Science of this type is fundamental for engineering special-purpose creations such as artificial worms that sniff out and eat cancer. Or bionic body parts for those who have suffered accidents or disease. Imagine having little swimmers in your system that rush to the site of a medical emergency such as a stroke. The promise of sensor-rich soft tissue frees robots to move more easily and yet not be cut off from needed input. Sensitized robot soft tissue could perform without the energy-sucking heaviness of metal or the artificial barrier of hard-plastic exoskeletons.

Source: Inc

07 PM | 10 Jul

Researchers develop multi-functional #smart #material that heals itself [#geekgirl]

Washington State University researchers have developed a unique, multi-functional smart material that can change shape from heat or light and can assemble and disassemble itself. It is the first time that researchers have been able to combine several smart abilities, including shape memory behavior, light-activated movement, and self-healing behavior, into one material.

Source: Design Indaba